Egg-shaped chocolate bonbonniere

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38
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A bonbonniere made from a dark chocolate egg mold, brushed for a subtle wood effect, and designed to hold your chocolates, truffles and Easter eggs

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Nicolas Cloiseau
Best Craftsman of France, Chocolatier
La Maison du Chocolat's Chef
THE TECHNIQUES THAT THE CHEF TEACHES IN THIS COURSE:
THE TECHNIQUES THAT THE CHEFS TEACH IN THIS COURSE:
THE TECHNIQUES THAT THE CHEF TEACHES YOU IN THIS COURSE:
  • Unmolding
  • Tempering chocolate
  • Making a chocolate molding
  • Carving chocolate
  • COMPLETION TIME:

    PREPARATIon:
    30 minutes
    COOKINGTIME:
    REST PERIOD:
    30 minutes
    INGREDIENTS

    1 kg dark chocolate couverture 61%.

    1 kg dark chocolate couverture 61%.

    voila chef
    SPECIFIC UTENSILS

    Egg mold
    Scraper
    Wire brush
    Soft bristle brush
    Rack with a tray

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    1. Chocolate technology 9:47
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • ...
  • Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Chocolate origins and manufacturing process Chocolate comes from a tree, the cocoa tree, which grows at 20° north and south of the equator. It is therefore found in Latin America, Africa and Indonesia. On these trees grow flowers, which yield cherelles that will later become pods. Inside these fruits, there is the cocoa bean, wrapped in a white pulp called the mucilage. These beans are fermented for 2 to 6 days, mucilage included, which starts to produce the first cocoa aromas (which depend on the variety of the cocoa tree, as well as the soil and the altitude at which it grew). The cocoa can thus have notes of red fruits, yellow fruits, dried fruits or even floral, woody, smoky notes... The fermentation process is interrupted by sun drying and stirring the beans, until the humidity level is reduced to less than 2%. They are then roasted (the duration and temperature vary). Next, they are crushed and finally sifted to remove the bean husk. The cocoa nibs are collected (appearance wise, they look like small grains). The nibs are ground to release the fat and obtain a cocoa liquor, which is also referred to as "100% pure paste" or "cocoa paste". A cocoa bean is made up of 50% fat, i.e., cocoa butter. Chocolate is made using this "100%" paste: sugar is added and will determine the percentage of cocoa present in the chocolate bar. Everything is then ground, to a varying degree of fineness, according to the desired granulometry (about 20 microns on average for an average chocolate found on the market), then it is refined. For milk chocolate, milk powder is added (in a powder form to avoid adding moisture) to sugar. For white chocolate, we use sugar, milk powder and cocoa butter only (hence the ongoing debate as to whether or not white chocolate should be labeled as "chocolate"). Cocoa butter is collected by pressing the cocoa paste against a very fine mesh, allowing only fatty matter to pass through. The dry matter thus separated from the cocoa butter (called "spent cocoa grains") by the sieve will be used to make cocoa powder. Cocoa butter is also added to the chocolate couverture to increase its fluidity and facilitate the coating process. Chocolate tempering In terms of chocolate tempering, the temperatures are as follows: - For dark chocolate: it is heated to 45-50° C, then 2/3 of it is poured on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 25-26° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 30-31° C. - For milk chocolate: heat it to 45° C, then pour 2/3 of it on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 26-27° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 29-30° C. - For white chocolate: heat it to 40-45° C and pour 2/3 of it on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 24-25° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 27-28° C. The fat content (cocoa butter) is what makes it possible for the chocolate to harden and it is made of 6 different molecules, which all have different melting points. If the chocolate is not tempered, these molecules will take a long time to crystallize: the molecules will then rise to the surface and cause the chocolate to bloom. Chocolate must therefore harden quickly to block the cocoa butter molecules. Tempering allows only a part of the molecules to crystallize, which gives you enough time to work with it, while guaranteeing a sufficiently rapid hardening. This crystallization ensures your chocolate will have a satisfactorily brittle texture, it will be smooth, shiny, and you'll be able to keep it longer.
    Chocolate origins and manufacturing process Chocolate comes from a tree, the cocoa tree, which grows at 20° north and south of the equator. It is therefore found in Latin America, Africa and Indonesia. On these trees grow flowers, which yield cherelles that will later become pods. Inside these fruits, there is the cocoa bean, wrapped in a white pulp called the mucilage. These beans are fermented for 2 to 6 days, mucilage included, which starts to produce the first cocoa aromas (which depend on the variety of the cocoa tree, as well as the soil and the altitude at which it grew). The cocoa can thus have notes of red fruits, yellow fruits, dried fruits or even floral, woody, smoky notes... The fermentation process is interrupted by sun drying and stirring the beans, until the humidity level is reduced to less than 2%. They are then roasted (the duration and temperature vary). Next, they are crushed and finally sifted to remove the bean husk. The cocoa nibs are collected (appearance wise, they look like small grains). The nibs are ground to release the fat and obtain a cocoa liquor, which is also referred to as "100% pure paste" or "cocoa paste". A cocoa bean is made up of 50% fat, i.e., cocoa butter. Chocolate is made using this "100%" paste: sugar is added and will determine the percentage of cocoa present in the chocolate bar. Everything is then ground, to a varying degree of fineness, according to the desired granulometry (about 20 microns on average for an average chocolate found on the market), then it is refined. For milk chocolate, milk powder is added (in a powder form to avoid adding moisture) to sugar. For white chocolate, we use sugar, milk powder and cocoa butter only (hence the ongoing debate as to whether or not white chocolate should be labeled as "chocolate"). Cocoa butter is collected by pressing the cocoa paste against a very fine mesh, allowing only fatty matter to pass through. The dry matter thus separated from the cocoa butter (called "spent cocoa grains") by the sieve will be used to make cocoa powder. Cocoa butter is also added to the chocolate couverture to increase its fluidity and facilitate the coating process. Chocolate tempering In terms of chocolate tempering, the temperatures are as follows: - For dark chocolate: it is heated to 45-50° C, then 2/3 of it is poured on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 25-26° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 30-31° C. - For milk chocolate: heat it to 45° C, then pour 2/3 of it on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 26-27° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 29-30° C. - For white chocolate: heat it to 40-45° C and pour 2/3 of it on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 24-25° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 27-28° C. The fat content (cocoa butter) is what makes it possible for the chocolate to harden and it is made of 6 different molecules, which all have different melting points. If the chocolate is not tempered, these molecules will take a long time to crystallize: the molecules will then rise to the surface and cause the chocolate to bloom. Chocolate must therefore harden quickly to block the cocoa butter molecules. Tempering allows only a part of the molecules to crystallize, which gives you enough time to work with it, while guaranteeing a sufficiently rapid hardening. This crystallization ensures your chocolate will have a satisfactorily brittle texture, it will be smooth, shiny, and you'll be able to keep it longer.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    voila chef
    2. Tempering dark chocolate 4:09
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Tempering chocolate
  • Ingredients:
    1 kg dark chocolate couverture 61%, heated to 45° C
    1 kg dark chocolate couverture 61%, heated to 45° C
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Tempering dark chocolate: Melt the dark couverture in a microwave or a bain-marie at 45° C. Pour 2/3 of the chocolate onto a cold baking sheet or onto a marble work surface then, using a scraper, spread it to bring its temperature down to 27-28° C. Collect the chocolate and return it to be round-bottomed mixing bowl where the remaining third is still hot in order to achieve a final temperature of 31° C. You can use a tempering machine to keep the chocolate at the right temperature, or a bain-marie with water that is kept at the same temperature.
    Tempering dark chocolate: Melt the dark couverture in a microwave or a bain-marie at 45° C. Pour 2/3 of the chocolate onto a cold baking sheet or onto a marble work surface then, using a scraper, spread it to bring its temperature down to 27-28° C. Collect the chocolate and return it to be round-bottomed mixing bowl where the remaining third is still hot in order to achieve a final temperature of 31° C. You can use a tempering machine to keep the chocolate at the right temperature, or a bain-marie with water that is kept at the same temperature.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    The chocolate temperature will drop down a lot faster if the baking sheet you'll be using is placed in the fridge for a while beforehand. You can melt the chocolate in a bain-marie, or even in the microwave, but be careful not to melt the chocolate too fast because it would burn the cocoa butter (don't set the microwave over 300 W or 400 W) and you wouldn't be able to use the chocolate at all.
    The chocolate temperature will drop down a lot faster if the baking sheet you'll be using is placed in the fridge for a while beforehand. You can melt the chocolate in a bain-marie, or even in the microwave, but be careful not to melt the chocolate too fast because it would burn the cocoa butter (don't set the microwave over 300 W or 400 W) and you wouldn't be able to use the chocolate at all.
    voila chef
    3. Molding the chocolate shells 8:45
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Making a chocolate molding
  • Ingredients:
    Tempered dark chocolate couverture 61% at a temperature of 31° C
    Tempered dark chocolate couverture 61% at a temperature of 31° C
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Use a thermoformed food-grade plastic mold (egg-shaped). Keep the tempered chocolate at 31° C. Fill the mold with chocolate in its entirety. Tap it to remove air bubbles, then empty it back into the round-bottomed mixing bowl. Place the mold upside down on a rack to let the chocolate drain into a tray. Let the chocolate crystallize for 3 to 5 minutes. Once crystallized, start trimming the edges: pass the blade of a knife horizontally on the edge of the mold to remove the excess of chocolate and achieve clean edges. Then, proceed the same way and add a second layer of chocolate: fill the mold with chocolate, tap it lightly then empty it and turn it over on the rack to let the chocolate drain and harden. Let the chocolate crystallize for 3 to 5 minutes. Once the chocolate has crystallized, trim the edges again. Set aside in the fridge at +4° C for 15 to 20 minutes.
    Use a thermoformed food-grade plastic mold (egg-shaped). Keep the tempered chocolate at 31° C. Fill the mold with chocolate in its entirety. Tap it to remove air bubbles, then empty it back into the round-bottomed mixing bowl. Place the mold upside down on a rack to let the chocolate drain into a tray. Let the chocolate crystallize for 3 to 5 minutes. Once crystallized, start trimming the edges: pass the blade of a knife horizontally on the edge of the mold to remove the excess of chocolate and achieve clean edges. Then, proceed the same way and add a second layer of chocolate: fill the mold with chocolate, tap it lightly then empty it and turn it over on the rack to let the chocolate drain and harden. Let the chocolate crystallize for 3 to 5 minutes. Once the chocolate has crystallized, trim the edges again. Set aside in the fridge at +4° C for 15 to 20 minutes.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    Filling the mold ensures that the chocolate covers the entire surface. Combining two layers of chocolate makes it easy to unmold the piece without breaking it yet it will be thin enough not to interfere with tasting. It is best to use an object (like a bar) to prop the molds against so that they are not resting flat on the rack: this will prevent them from sticking to the surface, which would make it difficult to remove them without damaging the shells. Once the edges of the mold have been trimmed twice, we can check if the edges of the mold are thick enough for the demolding stage: if not, it is advisable to add a third layer. When cooling, the chocolate will shrink because of it contains the cocoa butter (if the temperature curve was properly followed), which will facilitate the demolding.
    Filling the mold ensures that the chocolate covers the entire surface. Combining two layers of chocolate makes it easy to unmold the piece without breaking it yet it will be thin enough not to interfere with tasting. It is best to use an object (like a bar) to prop the molds against so that they are not resting flat on the rack: this will prevent them from sticking to the surface, which would make it difficult to remove them without damaging the shells. Once the edges of the mold have been trimmed twice, we can check if the edges of the mold are thick enough for the demolding stage: if not, it is advisable to add a third layer. When cooling, the chocolate will shrink because of it contains the cocoa butter (if the temperature curve was properly followed), which will facilitate the demolding.
    voila chef
    4. Unmolding the chocolate shells 1:03
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Unmolding
  • Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Take the molds out of the refrigerator. Lightly bend the molds to completely loosen the chocolate. Gently unmold the chocolate shells while sliding them to the sides and applying a slight pressure.
    Take the molds out of the refrigerator. Lightly bend the molds to completely loosen the chocolate. Gently unmold the chocolate shells while sliding them to the sides and applying a slight pressure.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    If the tempering process was done properly, the chocolate shell should be unmolded without forcing.
    If the tempering process was done properly, the chocolate shell should be unmolded without forcing.
    voila chef
    5. Brushing the shells to achieve a wood finish  7:43
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Carving chocolate
  • Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Using a wire brush, gently rub the surface of the eggs lengthwise to achieve a wood texture. With a knife, carve out small grooves in the chocolate to give the texture an irregular appearance, or make dots with the tip of the knife. Use a wire brush to even out the texture. Use a soft-bristle brush to remove the extra chocolate powder. Rubbing the surface with your hand will slightly melt the chocolate and change its color, proceed according to taste. Make sure that the two elements fit together properly so that you can seal the bonbonniere later on.
    Using a wire brush, gently rub the surface of the eggs lengthwise to achieve a wood texture. With a knife, carve out small grooves in the chocolate to give the texture an irregular appearance, or make dots with the tip of the knife. Use a wire brush to even out the texture. Use a soft-bristle brush to remove the extra chocolate powder. Rubbing the surface with your hand will slightly melt the chocolate and change its color, proceed according to taste. Make sure that the two elements fit together properly so that you can seal the bonbonniere later on.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    This step is intended to give the chocolate piece a wood finish. It is also possible to brush the inside part of the shell to achieve a uniform finish.
    This step is intended to give the chocolate piece a wood finish. It is also possible to brush the inside part of the shell to achieve a uniform finish.
    voila chef
    6. Assembling and decorating the bonbonniere 6:28
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Assembling chocolate elements
  • Ingredients:
    Tempered dark chocolate couverture or ivory couverture
    Tempered dark chocolate couverture or ivory couverture
    voila chef
    Completion:
    It is now time to combine our three recipes. You will need a hot plate, some tempered white or dark chocolate (in a cornet) and a presentation plate. Melt the underside of one of the half-egg shells (the domed part) on a hot plate to give it a base, to make sure it is stable once plated. Using a cornet, put a little chocolate on this base so it sticks to the plate. The white chocolate peonies will be glued to the other half of the bonbonniere: using a cornet, place a dot of chocolate on the shell, then delicately apply the flower until it sticks and sets. Arrange the flowers according to taste. Garnish the bonbonniere (the bottom half-egg that has been affixed to the plate) with the chocolate caramel truffles. Spread them evenly. Melt the edges of the top half of the egg (the one with the flowers pasted on it) by leaving them for a few seconds on the hot plate. Press it against the other half to assemble the complete egg and seal the edges. Run a finger along the edge to smooth it out and remove any excess chocolate: this gives a clean, crisp finish. And VOILA CHEF, enjoy!
    It is now time to combine our three recipes. You will need a hot plate, some tempered white or dark chocolate (in a cornet) and a presentation plate. Melt the underside of one of the half-egg shells (the domed part) on a hot plate to give it a base, to make sure it is stable once plated. Using a cornet, put a little chocolate on this base so it sticks to the plate. The white chocolate peonies will be glued to the other half of the bonbonniere: using a cornet, place a dot of chocolate on the shell, then delicately apply the flower until it sticks and sets. Arrange the flowers according to taste. Garnish the bonbonniere (the bottom half-egg that has been affixed to the plate) with the chocolate caramel truffles. Spread them evenly. Melt the edges of the top half of the egg (the one with the flowers pasted on it) by leaving them for a few seconds on the hot plate. Press it against the other half to assemble the complete egg and seal the edges. Run a finger along the edge to smooth it out and remove any excess chocolate: this gives a clean, crisp finish. And VOILA CHEF, enjoy!
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    If you do not have a hot plate, simply place a baking sheet over a bain-marie: the goal is to have a flat and warm surface. To make a cornet, roll a sheet of baking paper cut into a triangle. In our case, it is then filled with tempered white chocolate. It is possible to present the piece half-open rather than closed and sealed. The bonbonniere can be kept for up to 8 weeks, and the truffles for up to 3 weeks. Ideally, they should be stored between 12° C and 16° C.
    If you do not have a hot plate, simply place a baking sheet over a bain-marie: the goal is to have a flat and warm surface. To make a cornet, roll a sheet of baking paper cut into a triangle. In our case, it is then filled with tempered white chocolate. It is possible to present the piece half-open rather than closed and sealed. The bonbonniere can be kept for up to 8 weeks, and the truffles for up to 3 weeks. Ideally, they should be stored between 12° C and 16° C.
    voila chef
    And VOILA CHEF, it's your turn now!
    5. Brushing the shells to achieve a wood finish  7:43
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Using a wire brush, gently rub the surface of the eggs lengthwise to achieve a wood texture. With a knife, carve out small grooves in the chocolate to give the texture an irregular appearance, or make dots with the tip of the knife. Use a wire brush to even out the texture. Use a soft-bristle brush to remove the extra chocolate powder. Rubbing the surface with your hand will slightly melt the chocolate and change its color, proceed according to taste. Make sure that the two elements fit together properly so that you can seal the bonbonniere later on.
    Using a wire brush, gently rub the surface of the eggs lengthwise to achieve a wood texture. With a knife, carve out small grooves in the chocolate to give the texture an irregular appearance, or make dots with the tip of the knife. Use a wire brush to even out the texture. Use a soft-bristle brush to remove the extra chocolate powder. Rubbing the surface with your hand will slightly melt the chocolate and change its color, proceed according to taste. Make sure that the two elements fit together properly so that you can seal the bonbonniere later on.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    This step is intended to give the chocolate piece a wood finish. It is also possible to brush the inside part of the shell to achieve a uniform finish.
    This step is intended to give the chocolate piece a wood finish. It is also possible to brush the inside part of the shell to achieve a uniform finish.
    voila chef
    2. Tempering dark chocolate 4:09
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    1 kg dark chocolate couverture 61%, heated to 45° C
    1 kg dark chocolate couverture 61%, heated to 45° C
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Tempering dark chocolate: Melt the dark couverture in a microwave or a bain-marie at 45° C. Pour 2/3 of the chocolate onto a cold baking sheet or onto a marble work surface then, using a scraper, spread it to bring its temperature down to 27-28° C. Collect the chocolate and return it to be round-bottomed mixing bowl where the remaining third is still hot in order to achieve a final temperature of 31° C. You can use a tempering machine to keep the chocolate at the right temperature, or a bain-marie with water that is kept at the same temperature.
    Tempering dark chocolate: Melt the dark couverture in a microwave or a bain-marie at 45° C. Pour 2/3 of the chocolate onto a cold baking sheet or onto a marble work surface then, using a scraper, spread it to bring its temperature down to 27-28° C. Collect the chocolate and return it to be round-bottomed mixing bowl where the remaining third is still hot in order to achieve a final temperature of 31° C. You can use a tempering machine to keep the chocolate at the right temperature, or a bain-marie with water that is kept at the same temperature.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    The chocolate temperature will drop down a lot faster if the baking sheet you'll be using is placed in the fridge for a while beforehand. You can melt the chocolate in a bain-marie, or even in the microwave, but be careful not to melt the chocolate too fast because it would burn the cocoa butter (don't set the microwave over 300 W or 400 W) and you wouldn't be able to use the chocolate at all.
    The chocolate temperature will drop down a lot faster if the baking sheet you'll be using is placed in the fridge for a while beforehand. You can melt the chocolate in a bain-marie, or even in the microwave, but be careful not to melt the chocolate too fast because it would burn the cocoa butter (don't set the microwave over 300 W or 400 W) and you wouldn't be able to use the chocolate at all.
    voila chef
    3. Molding the chocolate shells 8:45
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    Tempered dark chocolate couverture 61% at a temperature of 31° C
    Tempered dark chocolate couverture 61% at a temperature of 31° C
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Use a thermoformed food-grade plastic mold (egg-shaped). Keep the tempered chocolate at 31° C. Fill the mold with chocolate in its entirety. Tap it to remove air bubbles, then empty it back into the round-bottomed mixing bowl. Place the mold upside down on a rack to let the chocolate drain into a tray. Let the chocolate crystallize for 3 to 5 minutes. Once crystallized, start trimming the edges: pass the blade of a knife horizontally on the edge of the mold to remove the excess of chocolate and achieve clean edges. Then, proceed the same way and add a second layer of chocolate: fill the mold with chocolate, tap it lightly then empty it and turn it over on the rack to let the chocolate drain and harden. Let the chocolate crystallize for 3 to 5 minutes. Once the chocolate has crystallized, trim the edges again. Set aside in the fridge at +4° C for 15 to 20 minutes.
    Use a thermoformed food-grade plastic mold (egg-shaped). Keep the tempered chocolate at 31° C. Fill the mold with chocolate in its entirety. Tap it to remove air bubbles, then empty it back into the round-bottomed mixing bowl. Place the mold upside down on a rack to let the chocolate drain into a tray. Let the chocolate crystallize for 3 to 5 minutes. Once crystallized, start trimming the edges: pass the blade of a knife horizontally on the edge of the mold to remove the excess of chocolate and achieve clean edges. Then, proceed the same way and add a second layer of chocolate: fill the mold with chocolate, tap it lightly then empty it and turn it over on the rack to let the chocolate drain and harden. Let the chocolate crystallize for 3 to 5 minutes. Once the chocolate has crystallized, trim the edges again. Set aside in the fridge at +4° C for 15 to 20 minutes.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    Filling the mold ensures that the chocolate covers the entire surface. Combining two layers of chocolate makes it easy to unmold the piece without breaking it yet it will be thin enough not to interfere with tasting. It is best to use an object (like a bar) to prop the molds against so that they are not resting flat on the rack: this will prevent them from sticking to the surface, which would make it difficult to remove them without damaging the shells. Once the edges of the mold have been trimmed twice, we can check if the edges of the mold are thick enough for the demolding stage: if not, it is advisable to add a third layer. When cooling, the chocolate will shrink because of it contains the cocoa butter (if the temperature curve was properly followed), which will facilitate the demolding.
    Filling the mold ensures that the chocolate covers the entire surface. Combining two layers of chocolate makes it easy to unmold the piece without breaking it yet it will be thin enough not to interfere with tasting. It is best to use an object (like a bar) to prop the molds against so that they are not resting flat on the rack: this will prevent them from sticking to the surface, which would make it difficult to remove them without damaging the shells. Once the edges of the mold have been trimmed twice, we can check if the edges of the mold are thick enough for the demolding stage: if not, it is advisable to add a third layer. When cooling, the chocolate will shrink because of it contains the cocoa butter (if the temperature curve was properly followed), which will facilitate the demolding.
    voila chef
    4. Unmolding the chocolate shells 1:03
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Take the molds out of the refrigerator. Lightly bend the molds to completely loosen the chocolate. Gently unmold the chocolate shells while sliding them to the sides and applying a slight pressure.
    Take the molds out of the refrigerator. Lightly bend the molds to completely loosen the chocolate. Gently unmold the chocolate shells while sliding them to the sides and applying a slight pressure.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    If the tempering process was done properly, the chocolate shell should be unmolded without forcing.
    If the tempering process was done properly, the chocolate shell should be unmolded without forcing.
    voila chef
    6. Assembling and decorating the bonbonniere 6:28
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    Tempered dark chocolate couverture or ivory couverture
    Tempered dark chocolate couverture or ivory couverture
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    It is now time to combine our three recipes. You will need a hot plate, some tempered white or dark chocolate (in a cornet) and a presentation plate. Melt the underside of one of the half-egg shells (the domed part) on a hot plate to give it a base, to make sure it is stable once plated. Using a cornet, put a little chocolate on this base so it sticks to the plate. The white chocolate peonies will be glued to the other half of the bonbonniere: using a cornet, place a dot of chocolate on the shell, then delicately apply the flower until it sticks and sets. Arrange the flowers according to taste. Garnish the bonbonniere (the bottom half-egg that has been affixed to the plate) with the chocolate caramel truffles. Spread them evenly. Melt the edges of the top half of the egg (the one with the flowers pasted on it) by leaving them for a few seconds on the hot plate. Press it against the other half to assemble the complete egg and seal the edges. Run a finger along the edge to smooth it out and remove any excess chocolate: this gives a clean, crisp finish. And VOILA CHEF, enjoy!
    It is now time to combine our three recipes. You will need a hot plate, some tempered white or dark chocolate (in a cornet) and a presentation plate. Melt the underside of one of the half-egg shells (the domed part) on a hot plate to give it a base, to make sure it is stable once plated. Using a cornet, put a little chocolate on this base so it sticks to the plate. The white chocolate peonies will be glued to the other half of the bonbonniere: using a cornet, place a dot of chocolate on the shell, then delicately apply the flower until it sticks and sets. Arrange the flowers according to taste. Garnish the bonbonniere (the bottom half-egg that has been affixed to the plate) with the chocolate caramel truffles. Spread them evenly. Melt the edges of the top half of the egg (the one with the flowers pasted on it) by leaving them for a few seconds on the hot plate. Press it against the other half to assemble the complete egg and seal the edges. Run a finger along the edge to smooth it out and remove any excess chocolate: this gives a clean, crisp finish. And VOILA CHEF, enjoy!
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    If you do not have a hot plate, simply place a baking sheet over a bain-marie: the goal is to have a flat and warm surface. To make a cornet, roll a sheet of baking paper cut into a triangle. In our case, it is then filled with tempered white chocolate. It is possible to present the piece half-open rather than closed and sealed. The bonbonniere can be kept for up to 8 weeks, and the truffles for up to 3 weeks. Ideally, they should be stored between 12° C and 16° C.
    If you do not have a hot plate, simply place a baking sheet over a bain-marie: the goal is to have a flat and warm surface. To make a cornet, roll a sheet of baking paper cut into a triangle. In our case, it is then filled with tempered white chocolate. It is possible to present the piece half-open rather than closed and sealed. The bonbonniere can be kept for up to 8 weeks, and the truffles for up to 3 weeks. Ideally, they should be stored between 12° C and 16° C.
    voila chef
    1. Chocolate technology 9:47
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
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    Preparation:
    Chocolate origins and manufacturing process Chocolate comes from a tree, the cocoa tree, which grows at 20° north and south of the equator. It is therefore found in Latin America, Africa and Indonesia. On these trees grow flowers, which yield cherelles that will later become pods. Inside these fruits, there is the cocoa bean, wrapped in a white pulp called the mucilage. These beans are fermented for 2 to 6 days, mucilage included, which starts to produce the first cocoa aromas (which depend on the variety of the cocoa tree, as well as the soil and the altitude at which it grew). The cocoa can thus have notes of red fruits, yellow fruits, dried fruits or even floral, woody, smoky notes... The fermentation process is interrupted by sun drying and stirring the beans, until the humidity level is reduced to less than 2%. They are then roasted (the duration and temperature vary). Next, they are crushed and finally sifted to remove the bean husk. The cocoa nibs are collected (appearance wise, they look like small grains). The nibs are ground to release the fat and obtain a cocoa liquor, which is also referred to as "100% pure paste" or "cocoa paste". A cocoa bean is made up of 50% fat, i.e., cocoa butter. Chocolate is made using this "100%" paste: sugar is added and will determine the percentage of cocoa present in the chocolate bar. Everything is then ground, to a varying degree of fineness, according to the desired granulometry (about 20 microns on average for an average chocolate found on the market), then it is refined. For milk chocolate, milk powder is added (in a powder form to avoid adding moisture) to sugar. For white chocolate, we use sugar, milk powder and cocoa butter only (hence the ongoing debate as to whether or not white chocolate should be labeled as "chocolate"). Cocoa butter is collected by pressing the cocoa paste against a very fine mesh, allowing only fatty matter to pass through. The dry matter thus separated from the cocoa butter (called "spent cocoa grains") by the sieve will be used to make cocoa powder. Cocoa butter is also added to the chocolate couverture to increase its fluidity and facilitate the coating process. Chocolate tempering In terms of chocolate tempering, the temperatures are as follows: - For dark chocolate: it is heated to 45-50° C, then 2/3 of it is poured on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 25-26° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 30-31° C. - For milk chocolate: heat it to 45° C, then pour 2/3 of it on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 26-27° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 29-30° C. - For white chocolate: heat it to 40-45° C and pour 2/3 of it on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 24-25° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 27-28° C. The fat content (cocoa butter) is what makes it possible for the chocolate to harden and it is made of 6 different molecules, which all have different melting points. If the chocolate is not tempered, these molecules will take a long time to crystallize: the molecules will then rise to the surface and cause the chocolate to bloom. Chocolate must therefore harden quickly to block the cocoa butter molecules. Tempering allows only a part of the molecules to crystallize, which gives you enough time to work with it, while guaranteeing a sufficiently rapid hardening. This crystallization ensures your chocolate will have a satisfactorily brittle texture, it will be smooth, shiny, and you'll be able to keep it longer.
    Chocolate origins and manufacturing process Chocolate comes from a tree, the cocoa tree, which grows at 20° north and south of the equator. It is therefore found in Latin America, Africa and Indonesia. On these trees grow flowers, which yield cherelles that will later become pods. Inside these fruits, there is the cocoa bean, wrapped in a white pulp called the mucilage. These beans are fermented for 2 to 6 days, mucilage included, which starts to produce the first cocoa aromas (which depend on the variety of the cocoa tree, as well as the soil and the altitude at which it grew). The cocoa can thus have notes of red fruits, yellow fruits, dried fruits or even floral, woody, smoky notes... The fermentation process is interrupted by sun drying and stirring the beans, until the humidity level is reduced to less than 2%. They are then roasted (the duration and temperature vary). Next, they are crushed and finally sifted to remove the bean husk. The cocoa nibs are collected (appearance wise, they look like small grains). The nibs are ground to release the fat and obtain a cocoa liquor, which is also referred to as "100% pure paste" or "cocoa paste". A cocoa bean is made up of 50% fat, i.e., cocoa butter. Chocolate is made using this "100%" paste: sugar is added and will determine the percentage of cocoa present in the chocolate bar. Everything is then ground, to a varying degree of fineness, according to the desired granulometry (about 20 microns on average for an average chocolate found on the market), then it is refined. For milk chocolate, milk powder is added (in a powder form to avoid adding moisture) to sugar. For white chocolate, we use sugar, milk powder and cocoa butter only (hence the ongoing debate as to whether or not white chocolate should be labeled as "chocolate"). Cocoa butter is collected by pressing the cocoa paste against a very fine mesh, allowing only fatty matter to pass through. The dry matter thus separated from the cocoa butter (called "spent cocoa grains") by the sieve will be used to make cocoa powder. Cocoa butter is also added to the chocolate couverture to increase its fluidity and facilitate the coating process. Chocolate tempering In terms of chocolate tempering, the temperatures are as follows: - For dark chocolate: it is heated to 45-50° C, then 2/3 of it is poured on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 25-26° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 30-31° C. - For milk chocolate: heat it to 45° C, then pour 2/3 of it on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 26-27° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 29-30° C. - For white chocolate: heat it to 40-45° C and pour 2/3 of it on a baking sheet to bring the temperature down to 24-25° C. Then, this chocolate is mixed with the remaining third in order to reach a final temperature of 27-28° C. The fat content (cocoa butter) is what makes it possible for the chocolate to harden and it is made of 6 different molecules, which all have different melting points. If the chocolate is not tempered, these molecules will take a long time to crystallize: the molecules will then rise to the surface and cause the chocolate to bloom. Chocolate must therefore harden quickly to block the cocoa butter molecules. Tempering allows only a part of the molecules to crystallize, which gives you enough time to work with it, while guaranteeing a sufficiently rapid hardening. This crystallization ensures your chocolate will have a satisfactorily brittle texture, it will be smooth, shiny, and you'll be able to keep it longer.
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    Chocolate Confectionery
    Easter 2024