Dark chocolate bar with hazelnut praline filling

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Paul Occhipinti
Head Chocolatier and Confectioner
Best Craftsman of France 
THE TECHNIQUES THAT THE CHEF TEACHES IN THIS COURSE:
THE TECHNIQUES THAT THE CHEFS TEACH IN THIS COURSE:
THE TECHNIQUES THAT THE CHEF TEACHES YOU IN THIS COURSE:
  • Tempering a praline
  • Pouring a preparation into a mold
  • Unmolding
  • Trimming a mold
  • Crystallizing a chocolate mix
  • Tempering chocolate
  • Tempering a praline
  • Mixing a preparation in a food processor
  • Closing a mold
  • Making a dry caramel
  • Making a chocolate molding
  • Making a praline
  • Using a piping bag
  • COMPLETION TIME:

    PREPARATIon:
    30 minutes
    COOKINGTIME:
    REST PERIOD:
    1 hour
    INGREDIENTS

    YIELDS 4 CHOCOLATE BARS:

    ~ 500 g dark chocolate 63%
    135 g milk chocolate 40%
    375 g raw & roasted Piedmont hazelnuts
    150 g sugar
    15 g milk powder
    4 g fleur de sel

    YIELDS 4 CHOCOLATE BARS:

    ~ 500 g dark chocolate 63%
    135 g milk chocolate 40%
    375 g raw & roasted Piedmont hazelnuts
    150 g sugar
    15 g milk powder
    4 g fleur de sel

    voila chef
    SPECIFIC UTENSILS

    Robot cutter
    Thermoformed plastic or polycarbonate mold
    Thermometer

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    1. Tempering chocolate 17:29
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Tempering chocolate
  • Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Place the dark chocolate in a microwave-safe container. Heat the chocolate 30 seconds at a time, and do not forget to stir every time. Once all the chocolate has melted and reached 50°C: start the tempering in the traditional way, i.e. on the marble (or work surface). Pour approximately two thirds of the chocolate on the previously washed work surface, and keep the remaining third of the chocolate in the container. Using a triangle or a maryse, cool the chocolate evenly. Start at the edges, then make zigzags in the center of the chocolate mass. Once the chocolate has cooled to 27-28°C, return all the chocolate to the container. Do a paper test to see if the chocolate is ready to be worked. Dip a small piece of parchment paper into the chocolate and leave to crystallize on the work surface, leave for 2 minutes at room temperature. If the chocolate hardens and comes away from the paper, it has been properly tempered. Here are the temperature curves according to the type of chocolate: - Dark chocolate: 50-55°C / 28-29°C / 31-32°C - Milk chocolate: 45-50°C / 27-28°C / 29-30°C - White chocolate: 40-45°C / 26-27°C / 28-29°C
    Place the dark chocolate in a microwave-safe container. Heat the chocolate 30 seconds at a time, and do not forget to stir every time. Once all the chocolate has melted and reached 50°C: start the tempering in the traditional way, i.e. on the marble (or work surface). Pour approximately two thirds of the chocolate on the previously washed work surface, and keep the remaining third of the chocolate in the container. Using a triangle or a maryse, cool the chocolate evenly. Start at the edges, then make zigzags in the center of the chocolate mass. Once the chocolate has cooled to 27-28°C, return all the chocolate to the container. Do a paper test to see if the chocolate is ready to be worked. Dip a small piece of parchment paper into the chocolate and leave to crystallize on the work surface, leave for 2 minutes at room temperature. If the chocolate hardens and comes away from the paper, it has been properly tempered. Here are the temperature curves according to the type of chocolate: - Dark chocolate: 50-55°C / 28-29°C / 31-32°C - Milk chocolate: 45-50°C / 27-28°C / 29-30°C - White chocolate: 40-45°C / 26-27°C / 28-29°C
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :

    Tempering chocolate is working with chocolate according to a defined temperature curve (depending on the chocolate) in order to obtain a chocolate which, on cooling, will have a hard, smooth and brilliant texture.
    The cocoa butter needs to be tempered in a very precise way to allow the crystals to crystallize properly, and to have a glossy and brittle finish.

    The ideal minimum quantity for tempering is 400 grams.

    Use the microwave instead of the bain-marie to melt the chocolate, so as not to add moisture.
    Do not heat dark chocolate above 50°C as this may burn it.

    The temperature is measured in motion with a laser thermometer.
    Always move what you want to measure.

    Work on a clean, flat work surface.
    It is possible to work on a work surface covered with plastic film.

    Scrape the edges of the container thoroughly so that the chocolate falls at the bottom of the bowl and the mass is properly homogenised.

    Use a heat source such as a heat gun or hair dryer to clean the work surface.

    When working with chocolate, it is best to be in a cool environment (19-20°C).

    No matter what the type of chocolate it is, the tempering process is the same, but follows different temperature curves, dictated by the presence of milk and by different levels of cocoa butter.
    Overheating milk chocolate or white chocolate could lead to rapid burning because there is the lactose in milk.

    After use, the chocolate can be stored at room temperature, but it must be wrapped tightly to prevent the cocoa butter from absorbing odours.
    The chocolate can be reused endlessly, but you need to temper it each time you use it.
    Over time and with use, the chocolate taste and texture will slightly change.

    A gourmet way to use leftover tempered chocolate is to prepare beggars by simply pouring it over roasted dried fruits.

    Tempering chocolate is working with chocolate according to a defined temperature curve (depending on the chocolate) in order to obtain a chocolate which, on cooling, will have a hard, smooth and brilliant texture.
    The cocoa butter needs to be tempered in a very precise way to allow the crystals to crystallize properly, and to have a glossy and brittle finish.

    The ideal minimum quantity for tempering is 400 grams.

    Use the microwave instead of the bain-marie to melt the chocolate, so as not to add moisture.
    Do not heat dark chocolate above 50°C as this may burn it.

    The temperature is measured in motion with a laser thermometer.
    Always move what you want to measure.

    Work on a clean, flat work surface.
    It is possible to work on a work surface covered with plastic film.

    Scrape the edges of the container thoroughly so that the chocolate falls at the bottom of the bowl and the mass is properly homogenised.

    Use a heat source such as a heat gun or hair dryer to clean the work surface.

    When working with chocolate, it is best to be in a cool environment (19-20°C).

    No matter what the type of chocolate it is, the tempering process is the same, but follows different temperature curves, dictated by the presence of milk and by different levels of cocoa butter.
    Overheating milk chocolate or white chocolate could lead to rapid burning because there is the lactose in milk.

    After use, the chocolate can be stored at room temperature, but it must be wrapped tightly to prevent the cocoa butter from absorbing odours.
    The chocolate can be reused endlessly, but you need to temper it each time you use it.
    Over time and with use, the chocolate taste and texture will slightly change.

    A gourmet way to use leftover tempered chocolate is to prepare beggars by simply pouring it over roasted dried fruits.

    voila chef
    2. Piedmont hazelnut, fleur de sel and milk chocolate praline 20:13
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Making a dry caramel
  • Making a praline
  • Mixing a preparation in a food processor
  • Tempering a praline
  • Tempering chocolate
  • Ingredients:
    375 g whole roasted Piedmont hazelnuts 150 g sugar 15 g milk powder 4 g fleur de sel 135 g milk chocolate 40% 
    375 g whole roasted Piedmont hazelnuts 150 g sugar 15 g milk powder 4 g fleur de sel 135 g milk chocolate 40% 
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Roast the hazelnuts in a ventilated oven at 150-160° C beforehand. Melt the milk chocolate in the microwave, in 30-second sequences, while stirring, without ever exceeding 50° C. At the same time, in a saucepan over medium heat, pour some of the sugar. Make a dry caramel. Stir with the maryse to help melt all the grains. Gradually add the remaining sugar and sprinkle on top of the caramel. Heat and stir until the caramel is of the desired color and flavor intensity. Pour the caramel onto a silicone baking sheet. Leave the ingredients to stand for 2-5 minutes so that they are all at room temperature for the praline. Using a Robot-Coupe Cutter, blend thewhole hazelnuts (skin included), caramel and milk powder. Mix until you get the right consistency for the praline: runny, but a little grainy still. Remove the praline from the mixing bowl and place it in a bowl. Add the fleur de sel. Temper the milk chocolate according to the temperature curve: 45-50° C / 27-28° C / 29-30° C. Add the finished milk chocolate to the praline and mix with a spatula. Before being poured into the mold, the praline with the chocolate should be around 27-28° C. Keep it at temperature.
    Roast the hazelnuts in a ventilated oven at 150-160° C beforehand. Melt the milk chocolate in the microwave, in 30-second sequences, while stirring, without ever exceeding 50° C. At the same time, in a saucepan over medium heat, pour some of the sugar. Make a dry caramel. Stir with the maryse to help melt all the grains. Gradually add the remaining sugar and sprinkle on top of the caramel. Heat and stir until the caramel is of the desired color and flavor intensity. Pour the caramel onto a silicone baking sheet. Leave the ingredients to stand for 2-5 minutes so that they are all at room temperature for the praline. Using a Robot-Coupe Cutter, blend thewhole hazelnuts (skin included), caramel and milk powder. Mix until you get the right consistency for the praline: runny, but a little grainy still. Remove the praline from the mixing bowl and place it in a bowl. Add the fleur de sel. Temper the milk chocolate according to the temperature curve: 45-50° C / 27-28° C / 29-30° C. Add the finished milk chocolate to the praline and mix with a spatula. Before being poured into the mold, the praline with the chocolate should be around 27-28° C. Keep it at temperature.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    Defining a roasting time for the hazelnuts depends on the oven, and on your personal taste, on how pronounced you want the flavor to be. The skin of the hazelnuts gives the praline its taste. There are two ways to make praline: either put the nuts and sugar in a pan and heat everything together, or make the caramel on one side and roast the nuts on the other. This second way allows you to play with the level of roasting and caramelization. Never use icing sugar to make caramel, as most icing sugars contain starch which would burn during caramelization. If the caramel smokes a little, remove it from the heat so that it does not burn. Given that this type of caramel is prepared without using any water, it is possible to mix as much as you like without the risk of crystallizing the sugar. You can make pralines with any dried fruit. Fruit pralines can also be made using lightly roasted white almond powder and fruit powder instead of milk powder. In the Robot-Coupe cutter, make sure to scrape the edges to ensure the nuts are crushed homogeneously. The number one risk when making praline or gianduja is the migration of the fat content and the formation of a fat bloom. There are 3 ways to reduce this phenomenon as much as possible: - allow the ingredients to cool before grinding - increase the dry matter content of the product, for example by adding milk powder - Grind as finely as possible (which does not mean you ought to grind it longer), e.g. using a granite grinder. Add the fleur de sel after grinding the other ingredients so that you can taste whole grains of salt. The result is a praline with whole grains of salt, as opposed to a salted praline. In chocolate making, the praline is said to be "collé" ("bound") when tempered chocolate is added inside. This is what gives the filling the right texture.
    Defining a roasting time for the hazelnuts depends on the oven, and on your personal taste, on how pronounced you want the flavor to be. The skin of the hazelnuts gives the praline its taste. There are two ways to make praline: either put the nuts and sugar in a pan and heat everything together, or make the caramel on one side and roast the nuts on the other. This second way allows you to play with the level of roasting and caramelization. Never use icing sugar to make caramel, as most icing sugars contain starch which would burn during caramelization. If the caramel smokes a little, remove it from the heat so that it does not burn. Given that this type of caramel is prepared without using any water, it is possible to mix as much as you like without the risk of crystallizing the sugar. You can make pralines with any dried fruit. Fruit pralines can also be made using lightly roasted white almond powder and fruit powder instead of milk powder. In the Robot-Coupe cutter, make sure to scrape the edges to ensure the nuts are crushed homogeneously. The number one risk when making praline or gianduja is the migration of the fat content and the formation of a fat bloom. There are 3 ways to reduce this phenomenon as much as possible: - allow the ingredients to cool before grinding - increase the dry matter content of the product, for example by adding milk powder - Grind as finely as possible (which does not mean you ought to grind it longer), e.g. using a granite grinder. Add the fleur de sel after grinding the other ingredients so that you can taste whole grains of salt. The result is a praline with whole grains of salt, as opposed to a salted praline. In chocolate making, the praline is said to be "collé" ("bound") when tempered chocolate is added inside. This is what gives the filling the right texture.
    voila chef
    3. Molding the chocolate bar 5:09
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Making a chocolate molding
  • Ingredients:
    500 g of dark chocolate 63%.
    500 g of dark chocolate 63%.
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Temper the dark chocolate and apply the following temperature curve: 50-55° C / 28-29° C / 31-32° C. Using a ladle, fill the mold completely. Using a triangle, slightly tap on the side, so that the chocolate completely and evenly covers the entire surface of the mold. Flip the mold in one sharp move, holding it as straight and parallel to the work surface as possible, so that the chocolate flows in a linear fashion. Tap with the triangle on the side to help the chocolate flow. Scrape off the excess chocolate with the triangle, while the mold is still facing the work surface. Tap it again, but this time, while it is facing the ceiling, to even out the distribution of the chocolate. Then, place the mold face down on a silicone baking sheet. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 5 minutes.
    Temper the dark chocolate and apply the following temperature curve: 50-55° C / 28-29° C / 31-32° C. Using a ladle, fill the mold completely. Using a triangle, slightly tap on the side, so that the chocolate completely and evenly covers the entire surface of the mold. Flip the mold in one sharp move, holding it as straight and parallel to the work surface as possible, so that the chocolate flows in a linear fashion. Tap with the triangle on the side to help the chocolate flow. Scrape off the excess chocolate with the triangle, while the mold is still facing the work surface. Tap it again, but this time, while it is facing the ceiling, to even out the distribution of the chocolate. Then, place the mold face down on a silicone baking sheet. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 5 minutes.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    If possible, opt for thermoformed plastic or polycarbonate molds. As soon as the chocolate starts to crystallize in the mold, apply heat with a heat gun or a hair dryer. If you are using a large mold, repeat this step 2 or 3 times. If your hands are small, you may find it difficult to hold the whole mold with one hand, but it is possible to put a grid on a container and turn the mold directly onto the grid and tap it.
    If possible, opt for thermoformed plastic or polycarbonate molds. As soon as the chocolate starts to crystallize in the mold, apply heat with a heat gun or a hair dryer. If you are using a large mold, repeat this step 2 or 3 times. If your hands are small, you may find it difficult to hold the whole mold with one hand, but it is possible to put a grid on a container and turn the mold directly onto the grid and tap it.
    voila chef
    4. Mold trimming 3:01
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Trimming a mold
  • Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Completion:
    In order to achieve a clean molding, trim off the excess chocolate on the edges of the mold. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 15 minutes.
    In order to achieve a clean molding, trim off the excess chocolate on the edges of the mold. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 15 minutes.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    Trimming the mold helps with the crystallization and the unmolding process.
    Trimming the mold helps with the crystallization and the unmolding process.
    voila chef
    5. Adding the praline filling 3:02
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Using a piping bag
  • Pouring a preparation into a mold
  • Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Fill a tipless piping bag with praline at a temperature of about 27-28° C. Fill the inside of the mold with praline, but make sure to leave a 1-2 mm gap. Gently tap on it to even it out. Leave to crystallize for 30 minutes at room temperature.
    Fill a tipless piping bag with praline at a temperature of about 27-28° C. Fill the inside of the mold with praline, but make sure to leave a 1-2 mm gap. Gently tap on it to even it out. Leave to crystallize for 30 minutes at room temperature.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    The praline can be poured at 26° C while it is still fluid. If the operation has to be repeated, it is advisable to weigh the ideal weight of praline per bar. If it is too hot to crystallize, the bar can be chilled for a few minutes at +4° C.
    The praline can be poured at 26° C while it is still fluid. If the operation has to be repeated, it is advisable to weigh the ideal weight of praline per bar. If it is too hot to crystallize, the bar can be chilled for a few minutes at +4° C.
    voila chef
    6. Sealing the chocolate mold 3:45
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Closing a mold
  • Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Using a heat source, such as a heat gun or a hair dryer, go ahead and decrystallize the edges of the mold. With a ladle, put a small amount of tempered dark chocolate on one side of the mold. Seal the mold with the chocolate in a single pass with the help of the triangle: from left to right for right-handed people, and vice versa for left-handed people. Clean the edges of the mold if necessary. Tap the mold lightly to homogenize its content. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 15 minutes.
    Using a heat source, such as a heat gun or a hair dryer, go ahead and decrystallize the edges of the mold. With a ladle, put a small amount of tempered dark chocolate on one side of the mold. Seal the mold with the chocolate in a single pass with the help of the triangle: from left to right for right-handed people, and vice versa for left-handed people. Clean the edges of the mold if necessary. Tap the mold lightly to homogenize its content. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 15 minutes.
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    Do not run the heat source over the mold for very long as it is made of plastic.
    Do not run the heat source over the mold for very long as it is made of plastic.
    voila chef
    7. Unmolding the chocolate bar 2:24
    voila chefMembers-only contentvoila chef
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:

  • Unmolding
  • Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Completion:
    Remove the bar from the mold. And VOILA CHEF, enjoy!
    Remove the bar from the mold. And VOILA CHEF, enjoy!
    voila chef
    Chef's Tips :
    Twist the ends of the mold a little to ease the unmolding process. This molding method can be applied to any shape of mold. The chocolate bar can be stored for several months at room temperature.
    Twist the ends of the mold a little to ease the unmolding process. This molding method can be applied to any shape of mold. The chocolate bar can be stored for several months at room temperature.
    voila chef
    And VOILA CHEF, it's your turn now!
    4. Mold trimming 3:01
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    In order to achieve a clean molding, trim off the excess chocolate on the edges of the mold. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 15 minutes.
    In order to achieve a clean molding, trim off the excess chocolate on the edges of the mold. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 15 minutes.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    Trimming the mold helps with the crystallization and the unmolding process.
    Trimming the mold helps with the crystallization and the unmolding process.
    voila chef
    5. Adding the praline filling 3:02
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Fill a tipless piping bag with praline at a temperature of about 27-28° C. Fill the inside of the mold with praline, but make sure to leave a 1-2 mm gap. Gently tap on it to even it out. Leave to crystallize for 30 minutes at room temperature.
    Fill a tipless piping bag with praline at a temperature of about 27-28° C. Fill the inside of the mold with praline, but make sure to leave a 1-2 mm gap. Gently tap on it to even it out. Leave to crystallize for 30 minutes at room temperature.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    The praline can be poured at 26° C while it is still fluid. If the operation has to be repeated, it is advisable to weigh the ideal weight of praline per bar. If it is too hot to crystallize, the bar can be chilled for a few minutes at +4° C.
    The praline can be poured at 26° C while it is still fluid. If the operation has to be repeated, it is advisable to weigh the ideal weight of praline per bar. If it is too hot to crystallize, the bar can be chilled for a few minutes at +4° C.
    voila chef
    3. Molding the chocolate bar 5:09
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    500 g of dark chocolate 63%.
    500 g of dark chocolate 63%.
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Temper the dark chocolate and apply the following temperature curve: 50-55° C / 28-29° C / 31-32° C. Using a ladle, fill the mold completely. Using a triangle, slightly tap on the side, so that the chocolate completely and evenly covers the entire surface of the mold. Flip the mold in one sharp move, holding it as straight and parallel to the work surface as possible, so that the chocolate flows in a linear fashion. Tap with the triangle on the side to help the chocolate flow. Scrape off the excess chocolate with the triangle, while the mold is still facing the work surface. Tap it again, but this time, while it is facing the ceiling, to even out the distribution of the chocolate. Then, place the mold face down on a silicone baking sheet. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 5 minutes.
    Temper the dark chocolate and apply the following temperature curve: 50-55° C / 28-29° C / 31-32° C. Using a ladle, fill the mold completely. Using a triangle, slightly tap on the side, so that the chocolate completely and evenly covers the entire surface of the mold. Flip the mold in one sharp move, holding it as straight and parallel to the work surface as possible, so that the chocolate flows in a linear fashion. Tap with the triangle on the side to help the chocolate flow. Scrape off the excess chocolate with the triangle, while the mold is still facing the work surface. Tap it again, but this time, while it is facing the ceiling, to even out the distribution of the chocolate. Then, place the mold face down on a silicone baking sheet. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 5 minutes.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    If possible, opt for thermoformed plastic or polycarbonate molds. As soon as the chocolate starts to crystallize in the mold, apply heat with a heat gun or a hair dryer. If you are using a large mold, repeat this step 2 or 3 times. If your hands are small, you may find it difficult to hold the whole mold with one hand, but it is possible to put a grid on a container and turn the mold directly onto the grid and tap it.
    If possible, opt for thermoformed plastic or polycarbonate molds. As soon as the chocolate starts to crystallize in the mold, apply heat with a heat gun or a hair dryer. If you are using a large mold, repeat this step 2 or 3 times. If your hands are small, you may find it difficult to hold the whole mold with one hand, but it is possible to put a grid on a container and turn the mold directly onto the grid and tap it.
    voila chef
    7. Unmolding the chocolate bar 2:24
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Remove the bar from the mold. And VOILA CHEF, enjoy!
    Remove the bar from the mold. And VOILA CHEF, enjoy!
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    Twist the ends of the mold a little to ease the unmolding process. This molding method can be applied to any shape of mold. The chocolate bar can be stored for several months at room temperature.
    Twist the ends of the mold a little to ease the unmolding process. This molding method can be applied to any shape of mold. The chocolate bar can be stored for several months at room temperature.
    voila chef
    6. Sealing the chocolate mold 3:45
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Using a heat source, such as a heat gun or a hair dryer, go ahead and decrystallize the edges of the mold. With a ladle, put a small amount of tempered dark chocolate on one side of the mold. Seal the mold with the chocolate in a single pass with the help of the triangle: from left to right for right-handed people, and vice versa for left-handed people. Clean the edges of the mold if necessary. Tap the mold lightly to homogenize its content. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 15 minutes.
    Using a heat source, such as a heat gun or a hair dryer, go ahead and decrystallize the edges of the mold. With a ladle, put a small amount of tempered dark chocolate on one side of the mold. Seal the mold with the chocolate in a single pass with the help of the triangle: from left to right for right-handed people, and vice versa for left-handed people. Clean the edges of the mold if necessary. Tap the mold lightly to homogenize its content. Leave to crystallize at room temperature for 15 minutes.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    Do not run the heat source over the mold for very long as it is made of plastic.
    Do not run the heat source over the mold for very long as it is made of plastic.
    voila chef
    1. Tempering chocolate 17:29
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Place the dark chocolate in a microwave-safe container. Heat the chocolate 30 seconds at a time, and do not forget to stir every time. Once all the chocolate has melted and reached 50°C: start the tempering in the traditional way, i.e. on the marble (or work surface). Pour approximately two thirds of the chocolate on the previously washed work surface, and keep the remaining third of the chocolate in the container. Using a triangle or a maryse, cool the chocolate evenly. Start at the edges, then make zigzags in the center of the chocolate mass. Once the chocolate has cooled to 27-28°C, return all the chocolate to the container. Do a paper test to see if the chocolate is ready to be worked. Dip a small piece of parchment paper into the chocolate and leave to crystallize on the work surface, leave for 2 minutes at room temperature. If the chocolate hardens and comes away from the paper, it has been properly tempered. Here are the temperature curves according to the type of chocolate: - Dark chocolate: 50-55°C / 28-29°C / 31-32°C - Milk chocolate: 45-50°C / 27-28°C / 29-30°C - White chocolate: 40-45°C / 26-27°C / 28-29°C
    Place the dark chocolate in a microwave-safe container. Heat the chocolate 30 seconds at a time, and do not forget to stir every time. Once all the chocolate has melted and reached 50°C: start the tempering in the traditional way, i.e. on the marble (or work surface). Pour approximately two thirds of the chocolate on the previously washed work surface, and keep the remaining third of the chocolate in the container. Using a triangle or a maryse, cool the chocolate evenly. Start at the edges, then make zigzags in the center of the chocolate mass. Once the chocolate has cooled to 27-28°C, return all the chocolate to the container. Do a paper test to see if the chocolate is ready to be worked. Dip a small piece of parchment paper into the chocolate and leave to crystallize on the work surface, leave for 2 minutes at room temperature. If the chocolate hardens and comes away from the paper, it has been properly tempered. Here are the temperature curves according to the type of chocolate: - Dark chocolate: 50-55°C / 28-29°C / 31-32°C - Milk chocolate: 45-50°C / 27-28°C / 29-30°C - White chocolate: 40-45°C / 26-27°C / 28-29°C
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:

    Tempering chocolate is working with chocolate according to a defined temperature curve (depending on the chocolate) in order to obtain a chocolate which, on cooling, will have a hard, smooth and brilliant texture.
    The cocoa butter needs to be tempered in a very precise way to allow the crystals to crystallize properly, and to have a glossy and brittle finish.

    The ideal minimum quantity for tempering is 400 grams.

    Use the microwave instead of the bain-marie to melt the chocolate, so as not to add moisture.
    Do not heat dark chocolate above 50°C as this may burn it.

    The temperature is measured in motion with a laser thermometer.
    Always move what you want to measure.

    Work on a clean, flat work surface.
    It is possible to work on a work surface covered with plastic film.

    Scrape the edges of the container thoroughly so that the chocolate falls at the bottom of the bowl and the mass is properly homogenised.

    Use a heat source such as a heat gun or hair dryer to clean the work surface.

    When working with chocolate, it is best to be in a cool environment (19-20°C).

    No matter what the type of chocolate it is, the tempering process is the same, but follows different temperature curves, dictated by the presence of milk and by different levels of cocoa butter.
    Overheating milk chocolate or white chocolate could lead to rapid burning because there is the lactose in milk.

    After use, the chocolate can be stored at room temperature, but it must be wrapped tightly to prevent the cocoa butter from absorbing odours.
    The chocolate can be reused endlessly, but you need to temper it each time you use it.
    Over time and with use, the chocolate taste and texture will slightly change.

    A gourmet way to use leftover tempered chocolate is to prepare beggars by simply pouring it over roasted dried fruits.

    Tempering chocolate is working with chocolate according to a defined temperature curve (depending on the chocolate) in order to obtain a chocolate which, on cooling, will have a hard, smooth and brilliant texture.
    The cocoa butter needs to be tempered in a very precise way to allow the crystals to crystallize properly, and to have a glossy and brittle finish.

    The ideal minimum quantity for tempering is 400 grams.

    Use the microwave instead of the bain-marie to melt the chocolate, so as not to add moisture.
    Do not heat dark chocolate above 50°C as this may burn it.

    The temperature is measured in motion with a laser thermometer.
    Always move what you want to measure.

    Work on a clean, flat work surface.
    It is possible to work on a work surface covered with plastic film.

    Scrape the edges of the container thoroughly so that the chocolate falls at the bottom of the bowl and the mass is properly homogenised.

    Use a heat source such as a heat gun or hair dryer to clean the work surface.

    When working with chocolate, it is best to be in a cool environment (19-20°C).

    No matter what the type of chocolate it is, the tempering process is the same, but follows different temperature curves, dictated by the presence of milk and by different levels of cocoa butter.
    Overheating milk chocolate or white chocolate could lead to rapid burning because there is the lactose in milk.

    After use, the chocolate can be stored at room temperature, but it must be wrapped tightly to prevent the cocoa butter from absorbing odours.
    The chocolate can be reused endlessly, but you need to temper it each time you use it.
    Over time and with use, the chocolate taste and texture will slightly change.

    A gourmet way to use leftover tempered chocolate is to prepare beggars by simply pouring it over roasted dried fruits.

    voila chef
    2. Piedmont hazelnut, fleur de sel and milk chocolate praline 20:13
    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT:
    Ingredients:
    375 g whole roasted Piedmont hazelnuts 150 g sugar 15 g milk powder 4 g fleur de sel 135 g milk chocolate 40% 
    375 g whole roasted Piedmont hazelnuts 150 g sugar 15 g milk powder 4 g fleur de sel 135 g milk chocolate 40% 
    voila chef
    Preparation:
    Roast the hazelnuts in a ventilated oven at 150-160° C beforehand. Melt the milk chocolate in the microwave, in 30-second sequences, while stirring, without ever exceeding 50° C. At the same time, in a saucepan over medium heat, pour some of the sugar. Make a dry caramel. Stir with the maryse to help melt all the grains. Gradually add the remaining sugar and sprinkle on top of the caramel. Heat and stir until the caramel is of the desired color and flavor intensity. Pour the caramel onto a silicone baking sheet. Leave the ingredients to stand for 2-5 minutes so that they are all at room temperature for the praline. Using a Robot-Coupe Cutter, blend thewhole hazelnuts (skin included), caramel and milk powder. Mix until you get the right consistency for the praline: runny, but a little grainy still. Remove the praline from the mixing bowl and place it in a bowl. Add the fleur de sel. Temper the milk chocolate according to the temperature curve: 45-50° C / 27-28° C / 29-30° C. Add the finished milk chocolate to the praline and mix with a spatula. Before being poured into the mold, the praline with the chocolate should be around 27-28° C. Keep it at temperature.
    Roast the hazelnuts in a ventilated oven at 150-160° C beforehand. Melt the milk chocolate in the microwave, in 30-second sequences, while stirring, without ever exceeding 50° C. At the same time, in a saucepan over medium heat, pour some of the sugar. Make a dry caramel. Stir with the maryse to help melt all the grains. Gradually add the remaining sugar and sprinkle on top of the caramel. Heat and stir until the caramel is of the desired color and flavor intensity. Pour the caramel onto a silicone baking sheet. Leave the ingredients to stand for 2-5 minutes so that they are all at room temperature for the praline. Using a Robot-Coupe Cutter, blend thewhole hazelnuts (skin included), caramel and milk powder. Mix until you get the right consistency for the praline: runny, but a little grainy still. Remove the praline from the mixing bowl and place it in a bowl. Add the fleur de sel. Temper the milk chocolate according to the temperature curve: 45-50° C / 27-28° C / 29-30° C. Add the finished milk chocolate to the praline and mix with a spatula. Before being poured into the mold, the praline with the chocolate should be around 27-28° C. Keep it at temperature.
    voila chef
    Tips from the Chef:
    Defining a roasting time for the hazelnuts depends on the oven, and on your personal taste, on how pronounced you want the flavor to be. The skin of the hazelnuts gives the praline its taste. There are two ways to make praline: either put the nuts and sugar in a pan and heat everything together, or make the caramel on one side and roast the nuts on the other. This second way allows you to play with the level of roasting and caramelization. Never use icing sugar to make caramel, as most icing sugars contain starch which would burn during caramelization. If the caramel smokes a little, remove it from the heat so that it does not burn. Given that this type of caramel is prepared without using any water, it is possible to mix as much as you like without the risk of crystallizing the sugar. You can make pralines with any dried fruit. Fruit pralines can also be made using lightly roasted white almond powder and fruit powder instead of milk powder. In the Robot-Coupe cutter, make sure to scrape the edges to ensure the nuts are crushed homogeneously. The number one risk when making praline or gianduja is the migration of the fat content and the formation of a fat bloom. There are 3 ways to reduce this phenomenon as much as possible: - allow the ingredients to cool before grinding - increase the dry matter content of the product, for example by adding milk powder - Grind as finely as possible (which does not mean you ought to grind it longer), e.g. using a granite grinder. Add the fleur de sel after grinding the other ingredients so that you can taste whole grains of salt. The result is a praline with whole grains of salt, as opposed to a salted praline. In chocolate making, the praline is said to be "collé" ("bound") when tempered chocolate is added inside. This is what gives the filling the right texture.
    Defining a roasting time for the hazelnuts depends on the oven, and on your personal taste, on how pronounced you want the flavor to be. The skin of the hazelnuts gives the praline its taste. There are two ways to make praline: either put the nuts and sugar in a pan and heat everything together, or make the caramel on one side and roast the nuts on the other. This second way allows you to play with the level of roasting and caramelization. Never use icing sugar to make caramel, as most icing sugars contain starch which would burn during caramelization. If the caramel smokes a little, remove it from the heat so that it does not burn. Given that this type of caramel is prepared without using any water, it is possible to mix as much as you like without the risk of crystallizing the sugar. You can make pralines with any dried fruit. Fruit pralines can also be made using lightly roasted white almond powder and fruit powder instead of milk powder. In the Robot-Coupe cutter, make sure to scrape the edges to ensure the nuts are crushed homogeneously. The number one risk when making praline or gianduja is the migration of the fat content and the formation of a fat bloom. There are 3 ways to reduce this phenomenon as much as possible: - allow the ingredients to cool before grinding - increase the dry matter content of the product, for example by adding milk powder - Grind as finely as possible (which does not mean you ought to grind it longer), e.g. using a granite grinder. Add the fleur de sel after grinding the other ingredients so that you can taste whole grains of salt. The result is a praline with whole grains of salt, as opposed to a salted praline. In chocolate making, the praline is said to be "collé" ("bound") when tempered chocolate is added inside. This is what gives the filling the right texture.
    voila chef
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    Chocolate Confectionery
    Easter 2024